Project Trans Am for September, 2013 – Engine Broken In and Taillights with Rear Bumper Installed

September was an exciting month for Project Trans Am. With summer coming to a close, we finally got the motor started and broken in!

Engine Break-in

Labor Day morning between 9am and 1pm was our scheduled break-in time with Joel. Before we broke in the motor, we did all the normal work priming the motor, setting the distributor and running the spark plug wires. The wires I got are molded specifically for a Pontiac V8. It took a few swaps before we finally got the right lengths to the correct cylinders. After checking fluids, we were ready to go. Unfortunately this ate up a good 3 of our 4 hours.

You know the saying, second time is a charm? Well that applies with the engine break-in too! When we tried to start the motor, it back fired once, then we had a fuel leak. Then after fixing all the little problems, we just never got any spark. We had limited time available due to the labor day holiday, so we had to put off getting her started till Tuesday. That night though I discovered we did not have the distributor shaft pointing at the number one spark plug wire on the distributor cap. That night I repositioned the distributor so we were ready to go the next day. You can see from the pictures, we were off a good 150+ degrees.

Distributor Before Distributor After

The next morning Joel came over, within 10 minutes we had the motor fired up and in break-in mode. We let it run for 30 minutes between 2,000 and 3,000 rpm, not keeping it too long on one particular rpm. then once we were done, we got the idle set at about 700 rpm.

Engine Break-in Engine Break-in Engine Break-in

The Good News

The engine runs strong! Touching the gas pedal, she responds instantly. The exhaust sounds really good, inside noise is low thanks to the deadener on the floors, and all the electronics, gauges and switches appear to be working properly. Electrical wise, the only problem I saw was with the dome light flickering when the door was open. I never tested the door jam switches, so hopefully they are just worn out and replacements will fix that problem. Otherwise, the car electrical is good to go! Water temperature was right at 190 degrees, which is perfect. I am running a 180 degree thermostat, so this is right on par with what I wanted temperature wise. Everything was better than I expected, except for the oil pressure.

Last year I was able to test all of the gauges except for the tachometer. I am happy to report the tachometer works! it appears to be off by about 200 rpm, but that’s acceptable. Even the brake light, choke light and seat belt lights worked!

Gauges Working Gauges Working Gauges Working

Low Oil Pressure!

During engine break-in, oil pressure was between 30-40psi, which is ok. But when we were done and started setting the engine for idle, we noticed oil pressure was below 10 when the RPMs hovered down around 700. We promptly turned off the motor, let it cool, then changed the oil filter and 30 weight break-in oil with 20W50 (the weight motor oil I plan on running). Cold oil pressure is strong at 65psi, but once it was warmed up, pressure at idle was at about 15 psi.  revving the engine increases oil pressure, at 2,000 rpm I see about 25-30psi, and close to 3,000 rpm I am seeing about 35-40psi. So the oil pressure problem appears to be related to idle. I expected to see 20psi at idle with 10psi added for every 1,000 rpm.

The following week Joel came over and helped me pull the motor to replace the oil pump to see if we can get that oil pressure up where it should be.

I decided to take the motor and new oil pump to DCI Motorsports to replace the oil pump with a blueprinted pump. At this point I am pretty pleased with my engine building skills, but in the future, I will have my engines built so all I have to do is install top-end components and focus on the other car details.

Taillights and Rear Bumper Installed

The rear taillights are now wired, mounted and ready to go! Switching from a 79-81 rear bumper to a 77/78 style is not a simple task. There are many ways to approach the problem. One way is to replace the entire tail panel with an older tail panel so the taillights mount right up (this way is requires a lot of body work). A second option is to drill new holes into the existing tail panel to allow for the older taillights to mount to (simplest way, but modifies the tail panel). The third option (which I did) was create brackets on the taillights to relocate the studs to line up with the existing 79-81 tail panel (leaves the tail panel unmodified). This was a time consuming task that involved 3/16″ thick aluminum stock, a lot of tapping and threading, and even more patience. the result is what you see, without taking the taillights off you would not be able to tell it’s bolted to a 1981 tail panel.

IMG_20130922_185925 (Large) IMG_20130922_185916 (Large)

In the short time I had, I put a few light coats of Krylon Fusion gloss black paint on the taillight frames. Next year I will take them off and properly paint them, but for now it’s better than what they looked like before.

What’s Next?

October and November I will be switching gears and working on the house before winter sets in. I may get to do a little wrenching here/there, but it will be minimal. Hopefully I will get the motor back from DCI before Christmas so I can get the remaining front fenders, front bumper and hood installed and finally take her for a spin before the first snow fall!

Project Trans Am for August, 2013 – Exhaust System, Cooling System & Transmission, and Electrical

This has been another productive month for Project Trans Am!

Exhaust System Installed

This was a major pain in the rear. I think the Pypes brand exhaust makes a quality product, but I have to admit that the amount of tweaking I had to do to make the system work in my car was beyond what I expected for the price I paid. Most of the headaches were from the mufflers back. I purchased a second tail pipe kit in hopes to get the chrome splitter tips lined up better with no luck. I will need to take the car to a muffler shop to get the tips welded on. The stainless steel Pypes tips are not capable of being clamped onto the tail pipes, leaving only welding as an option.

If I had to do it over again, I would get the 2nd Generation Firebird/Camaro dual exhaust system from Jegs or Summit Racing.

Installed all Engine Accessories, Wires and Hoses

This was a rather simple task, or set of tasks. The only problem I ran into was when I tried to bolt on the alternator without the power steering pump. The factory brackets are designed to have both brackets in place, so when I installed them without the power steering brackets, the alternator did not line up. Once I installed the power steering pump though everything went together well. I decided not to run the power steering pump during engine break in and have since removed the power steering belt since I took the pictures below.

Engine Accessories Engine Accessories

Inner Fenders and Core Support Installed with Transmission Lines and Coolant Hoses

Installing the core support and inner fenders was pretty simple task. It took some time though since I am replacing all of the body U nuts and body bolts. The engine bay is really coming together now! Installing the transmission lines was the only annoying part. I had to buy a crowfoot 1/2″ wrench in order to tighten the transmission lines to the transmission because I already had the exhaust installed. Had I thought about this ahead of time, I could have installed the lines on the transmission side before running the exhaust.

Core Support and Fenders Core Support and Fenders

Front Light Harness and Engine Harness

Luckily, the front headlight harness only needed a good cleaning. Unfortunately, I could not say the same for the engine harness. For the Engine harness, I started by identifying all the plugs that needed to be replaced, followed by replacing wire where ever possible. While I was working on the wiring harness, I decided to reroute the positive wires that go to the back of the alternator to a junction terminal on the inner fender. This allowed me to put all of the fusable links in the same location with easy access to repair if needed. Hopefully the fusable links never blow. The end result though is a much cleaner wiring system between the alternator and all of the necessary accessories.

Engine Wiring

Here are some details: I used 10 gauge wire between the alternator and the red power junction box you see in the picture above. The junction box is Caspers Electronics 103004, I got it from Jegs here in Columbus. Not shown in the picture is the factory wiring that I rewired plus the 2 additional wires I added for the AC/heater fan (12 gauge wire) and wire to fuse block in glovebox for the stereo and power windows (10 gauge wire).

What’s Next?

She’s almost ready to start! Stay tuned for September for engine break-in details!